About

Meet our Team

Bailey Smith



Learning Center Teacher
basmith@kentshill.org
Margaret Staggs



Nurse
207-685-1624
mstaggs@kentshill.org
Dr. Joseph Fitzpatrick



Clinical Director
207-685-1656
jfitzpatrick@kentshill.org
George Dunn



Transportation
Andrew Deaett



Environmental Studies Teacher
Sustainability Coordinator
adeaett@kentshill.org
Robert Whittaker



Director of Advancement
207-685-1657
rwhittaker@kentshill.org
Robert Laverdure

Controller
Rebbeca Reynolds



Associate Director of Admissions
Andrew Carlucci



Educational Intern
Jacob Burke



Operations and Ground Manager
207-685-1639
jburke@kentshill.org
Gillian Barnes



Director of Marketing
Maine Hall Dorm Parent
New Hampshire Institute of Art, B.F.A.
207-685-1617
gbarnes@kentshill.org
Linda Albert



Admissions Office Manager
207-685-1612
lalbert@kentshill.org

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  • About Linda

    Linda joined Kents Hill School in June 2013 as Admissions Office Manager. In addition to overseeing office operations, she coordinates the Admissions Office’s systems integrations, performs database management, and manages I-20 documentation for international students.

    Linda and her husband Rick live in Augusta. Outside of school, Linda enjoys gardening, cooking, kayaking, snowshoeing, and basket weaving.
Kym Arian



Director of Human Resources
SHRM-SCP
Tulane University, B.B.M.
Boston University, M.S.
207-685-1686
karian@kentshill.org
Emilie Arseneault



World Languages Teacher
Reed Hall Dorm Parent
Girls Varsity Ice Hockey Head Coach
Elite Fitness Coach
Union College, B.A.
Concordia University, M.A.

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  • About Emilie

    What is your favorite saying or idiom in a language other than English? What does it mean?

    “Quand les poules auront des dents,” which literally translates to “when hens have teeth.” This is the French equivalent to “when pigs fly.” This saying flies off the tongue easily and makes me laugh because researchers have now succeeded in growing teeth in chickens. I look forward to seeing some pigs with wings in our future.

    Why should everyone learn to speak more than one language? 

    I think Trevor Noah answers this question perfectly in his book, Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood. He states: “Nelson Mandela once said, 'If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.' He was so right. When you make the effort to speak someone else's language, even if it's just basic phrases here and there, you are saying to them, 'I understand that you have a culture and identity that exists beyond me. I see you as a human being.” By speaking to someone in their own language you can learn more about the whole person and their culture. Even if you’re not fluent, the attempt brings us together as humans. It shows that you deeply respect them as an entity and that there are things more important than your own personal bubble.
     
David Balberchak



Director of Plant and Facilities
207-685-1626
dbalberchak@kentshill.org
Marc Bartholomew



Director of Technology
207-685-1655
mbartholomew@kentshill.org


Gretchen Bergill



Director of College Counseling
Recreational Skiing Coach
Colby College, B.A.
207-685-1685
gbergill@kentshill.org
Tammy Birtwell


 
Registrar
Lilia Bottino



School Counselor
Coordinator of Health and Wellness
LCSW
University of Vermont, B.A.
University of New England, M.S.W.

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  • About Lilia

    What are your specialties?

    I am a licensed clinical social worker who has been practicing with adolescents and families for the past 6 years. Working with teenagers is truly my passion, which I've developed through clinical work in homes, schools, and communities, as well as through research and education. I love to work in environments where I can meet those I work with where they are, and focus on fostering a strong therapeutic relationship. Kents Hill School is the perfect place for this practice, as it allows for an integrated approach to emotional support for students on campus.

    What is one wellness tip or strategy that everyone should know, but might not?


    Our relationships are our most valuable resource. In the world of Positive Psychology, the data is clear: The single most reliable predictor of happiness and mental/emotional well-being is the size, strength, and quality of your social network. The number of social relationships you have, the strength of those relationships, and the nature of those relationships create a combined value that is directly correlated with your happiness, and therefore your overall physical and mental health! I am also a big believer that laughter truly is the best medicine!
Michael Brackett



World Languages Department Chair
Spanish Teacher
Wesleyan Hall Dorm Head
University of Southern Maine, B.A.
Universite Laval, M.A.
Universite Laval, Ph.D.

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  • About DB

    What is your favorite saying or idiom in a language other than English? What does it mean?

    In Chinese, there are sayings called “Chéngyǔ” (成语). These are four-character sets that are shorthand for stories that contain ancient wisdom. My favorite is 塞翁失马 (sàiwēngshīmǎ). It means “Old Man Loses Horse” and is a story about an old frontiersman who lost his horse. All the townsfolk lament how this is a horrible thing. The old frontiersman remarks, “Who knows? It could be positive or negative.” Then, the horse who fled returns with another horse. At this, the townsfolk noted how this was a great turn of fate, for now, the man had two horses! The old horseman gave the same retort. Later, when the old frontiersman’s son was riding the new horse, he fell and was seriously injured, such that he would never walk right again. The townsfolk were unanimous in how this turn of events was quite awful. The old frontiersman was again non-committal in his evaluation of the situation. “Who knows?” he said. “It could be good or bad.” Later, the army was passing through the village, forcibly enlisting young men into the army. The old frontiersman’s son was spared being forced to go fight in a faraway war. The townsfolk, many of whom had had their sons pressed into service against their will, now realized that the old man losing his horse, and even his son’s horrible accident, ended up being blessings in the long run. Thus, when something seemingly negative happens, Chinese people can simply (and stoically!) state, 塞翁失马 (“Old man loses horse”) to indicate that even things that seem negative now might actually be blessings in disguise.

    Why should everyone learn to speak more than one language?

    Learning another language is one of the most rewarding things someone can do. First, learning another language activates different parts of the brain. According to some research, bilingualism may offer some defense against dementia (and other diseases involving cognitive decline) later in life. As such, learning another language is a good exercise for the brain. More importantly, it’s also good for the soul. Learning another language helps you understand other people and other cultures in a more profound way. Thought and language are intertwined and influence each other in many surprising ways. When you acquire a second (or third or fourth!) language, you train your brain to adopt and use different ways of seeing and structuring the world. It forces us to step out of the linguistic prison house of our native language, permitting us to adopt thought patterns and systems of classification proper to peoples and societies very different from ours. It also allows us to communicate with others in their native tongue, helping us to understand their reality better. That’s the biggest payoff. In summary, not only is learning another language a great workout for your brain, but it will also give you access to other cultures and new ways of thinking, all the while helping you form real bonds of friendship and community with people of every nation and creed.
     


     
Adam Chabot



English Department Chair
English Teacher
Boys Varsity Soccer Head Coach
Boys Junior Varsity Ice Hockey Coach
University of Maine at Farmington, B.F.A.
achabot@kentshill.org

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  • About Adam

    What is a book that changed your life?

    It’s possible this may seem like an English teacher cliché, but the book that changed my life was The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. When I first read it as a tenth grader, I honestly didn’t care for it because the world in which the characters lived didn’t make sense to me; I grew up in rural New Hampshire, not in the hustle and bustle of New York City. However, reading it again as an adult at the start of my teaching career eight years ago, I felt like this was the novel I needed at that time in order to make a transition from student to teacher. This novel taught me about the importance of taking responsibility for one’s actions, about the realities of the fragile line between success and failure, and the value of friendship. Plus, it’s only about 180 pages!

    What is your best trick for curing writer's block?
    

    In my Creative Writing classes, I always tell my students to write what you know. I think some writers can try too hard to create elaborate storylines, gut-punch endings, or perfect characters, but writing, as Flannery O’Connor once said must pay “the strictest attention to the real.” Humans, including ourselves, are not as boring or as weird as we might think, therefore if we can look at the world with subjective curiosity, write to discover, and focus on character development as the beating heart of our stories, our creative writing should be easier to write, more enjoyable, and should provide a truthful lens that will compel your readers.
Christopher Cheney



Head of School
Bowdoin College, B.S.
Harvard University, M.Ed.
207-685-1636

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  • About Chris

    With 25 years of experience in education, Chris has spent his entire professional life preparing young leaders for maximum impact in their careers and communities.

    Prior to his tenure at Kents Hill School, Chris served as the Head of School at LEAF Academy in Bratislava, Slovakia; Assistant Dean for Admissions and University Guidance at African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg, South Africa; and Chair of the Environmental Science Department and Director of College Advising at Kimball Union Academy. He has also held teaching positions at Colorado Academy, Northfield Mount Hermon School, Williston Northampton School, Milton Academy, and Hanover High School. He is a graduate of Bowdoin College where he earned a degree in Biology and Environmental Studies, and Harvard University where he received a M.Ed. with a concentration in administration, planning, and social policy.
     
    His wife, Lisa DiIorio, has also dedicated her career to developing the potential of young people, most recently as Curriculum Coordinator at LEAF Academy and Head of the Writing and Rhetoric Department at African Leadership Academy. Lisa earned her undergraduate degree in English from Bates College, and graduate degree from Dartmouth College. Chris and Lisa are the parents of two daughters, Shea, age 12, and Zoe, age 10.
Diane Chick



Dean of Students
Math Teacher
Marietta College, M.A.
207-685-1627
dchick@kentshill.org

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  • About Diane

    What is an activity the requires math that people wouldn’t think does?

    Origami, or paper folding, is an activity that some would not think requires math. However, there are mathematicians (Erik Demaine, Thomas Hull, Robert Lang) who produce amazing mathematical origami! There is even a documentary about them and other paper-folders called "Between the Folds" that everyone should watch.

    Who is the most interesting mathematician you’ve studied?

    Mathematician John Nash Jr., impressed me with his dedication to problem-solving, especially in the area of game theory. Nash struggled with schizophrenia beginning in his early thirties. He went on to win the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences and the Abel Prize. He is the only person to be awarded both of those prizes. John persevered through many lows in his life and with the help of his wife, Alicia, achieved greatness. Nash's theories continue to be used in economics.
Erica Chute



Dean of Student and Residential Life
St. Michael's College, B.S.
University of Southern Maine, M.Ed.
207-685-1644
echute@kentshill.org
Lara Cole '09




Director of Strategic Communications and Initiatives 
English Teacher
Reed Hall Dorm Head
Northeastern University, B.A.
Northeastern University, M.S.
207-685-1684
Tim Corey



Math Teacher
Sampson Hall Dorm Parent
Boys Varsity Baseball Coach
Elite Fitness Coach
Colby College, B.A.
Thomas College, M.Ed

tcorey@kentshill.org

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  • About Tim

    Is math a tool? Why or why not?

    Math is the ultimate form of feedback. Being able to analyze and interpret situations in real-time with a mathematical mind provides tangible quantitative support of decision-making. Using math as such a tool happens, for example, every morning when you decide when to set your alarm, how many layers to wear based on the weather, and how many eggs to eat for breakfast.

    Who is the most interesting mathematician you’ve studied?

    Bill James, credited with creating sabermetrics in baseball, is the most interesting mathematician I have studied. Mr. James was decades ahead of his time and took risks in publishing his thoughts against the conventional wisdom of baseball lifers; a true sign of courage. Mr. James paved the way for a generation of front office "quants," who may have never played the game themselves, but are able to manipulate seemingly endless data to continue to increase the ceiling of player development.
Matthew Crane '90



Director of Engagement and Outreach
University of Maine, B.A.
Tufts University, M.A.
207-685-1682

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  • About Matthew

    A graduate of Kents Hill School and the University of Maine, Matt Crane began his career at Kents Hill in 1995 in the math department and in communications, where he edited and designed the Kents Hill Today Magazine. He was the varsity baseball coach and assistant coach for football. He soon shifted to the admissions office, where he became director in 1999 until his departure in 2003. Following a year completing his masters in Educational Leadership from Tufts University, Matt served for two years as the Director of Admissions at Saint Mary’s School in Raleigh, NC. 

    Matt married Mary Sheridan in 2004 and their son, Finn, was born in 2005 while they were in North Carolina. Mary, a local veterinarian, purchased Winthrop Veterinary Hospital in 2006 and Matt returned to Kents Hill assuming the Role of Director of Advancement.
Lehlabile Davhana



Coordinator of Diversity, Equity, and Belonging
Math Teacher
Sampson Hall Dorm Parent
Trinity College, B.A.
ldavhana@kentshill.org
Meadow Davis



Associate Head of School
Trinity College, B.A.
Notre Dame of Maryland University, M.A.
207-685-1622
mdavis@kentshill.org
Jeff DeHaven



English Teacher
Boys Varsity Ice Hockey Coach
Ohio University, B.A. 
Ohio University, M.A.
jdehaven@kentshill.org

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  • About Jeff

    What is a book all teenagers should read before they graduate high school?

    Everybody should read Toni Morrison's Pulitzer Prize winning novel Beloved. Because it deals realistically and empathically with the horrid and hideous institution of slavery and Morrison handles time in a fluid manner, Beloved is not an easy novel to read. However, by the time you are a senior at Kents Hill, you will have the skills necessary to read perhaps the greatest author of our time. If you want to get an introduction to Morrison before reading her most challenging workSula and The Bluest Eye will show you why she won the Nobel Prize for Literature.

    What is a book that changed your life?

    After I graduated from high school, I went to college, but I flunked out after the first year. I wasn't much of a reader, but after living and working a variety of jobs in Florida, I moved to Ohio to work with my brother on a farm that he and his wife had bought after they graduated from Marietta College. All I did on the farm was work and read; one of the first books I read was The Autobiography of Malcolm X and it changed the way I thought and the way that I looked at life. Malcolm X detailed how he went from being a small-time drug pusher, pimp, and hustler to being a leader in his community and of the civil rights movement. I knew when I finished that book that if Malcolm could make the kind of changes in his life that he made from a jail cell, I could change the trajectory of my life from a farm. Two years later, when my brother and his wife sold the farm and went to graduate school, I went to college and developed a lifelong love of learning that Malcolm taught me about on the farm.
Shaelie Dumont '10



Science Teacher
Assistant Director of Community Engagement
Davis Hall Dorm Head
Girls Varsity Field Hockey Coach
Girls Varsity Softball Head Coach
Denison University, B.S.
207-685-1692
sdumont@kentshill.org
Janet Dunn



Director Emerita of the Learning Center
Academic Coach
Equestrian Coach
Keene State College, B.S.
207-685-1645

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  • About Janet

    What are the subjects that you most enjoy helping students with?

    I most enjoy helping students with math and history. I struggled with math as a student and developed an intense dislike for the subject. However, when I began working with students many years ago, I began to approach math differently. I looked at it as a puzzle to be solved and found that the more I worked at it, the better I got. I enjoy working with students who struggle the same way I did. I even began teaching an Integrated Math class for students who need a little more explanation and support to learn the concepts. It gives me satisfaction to hear students who hated math say that they really like their math class! U.S. History is also an interest of mine, as I like learning about the history of our country. I enjoy reading historical novels and find there are so many interesting projects one can do with the information a student learns in history.

    What is your go-to organizational strategy for your own life?

Andrea Emmershy



Executive Assistant to the Head of School and Associate Head of School 
Sue Fish



Accounting Assistant
University of Maine at Augusta, B.A.
207-685-1678
Jordan Gehman



Art Department Co-Chair
Woodworking and Design Teacher
Outing Club Activity Leader
Maine College of Art, B.F.A.
San Diego State University, M.F.A.
jgehman@kentshill.org

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  • About Jordan

    What is a piece of your work that you have learned the most from? Why?

    Each piece is a step in the journey of learning a craft. As my mentor said to me, “It is not about the piece you are making… it’s about the next piece you are going to make.” I challenge myself to explore new processes and investigate new ideas to keep my work moving forward. Each small success and major mistake adds up to who you are and what your work becomes over time.

    Who is your favorite artist?

    My point of entry into furniture as a subject of research can be attributed to the ideas and works of Marcel Duchamp. He transformed my understanding of what functional objects are or can become in relation to an artistic process and product. Duchamp’s work questions why and how we understand items as ordinary as a stool or a shovel, his works open new ways of thinking about fine art and its relationship with functional objects. Through the use of juxtaposition and wordplay, Duchamp subverts our understanding of tools his Readymade series consists of prefabricated objects with minimal or no alterations that were placed into a fine art context simply by declaring them art. Works in this series included pieces such as a wall hung shovel entitled In Advance of a Broken Arm (1915), and Fountain (1917) which is little more than a urinal, titled, signed with a surname, and placed on a pedestal. Through these small gestures of contextual reassignment Duchamp introduced us to found objects, and in turn, altered how we perceive the role of function in contemporary art.
     
Dylan Gifford



Visual Arts Teacher
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, B.F.A.
dgifford@kentshill.org

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  • About Dylan

    What is your favorite color? Why?

    I don’t know if I have an absolute favorite, I can make a case for any color. However, at the moment I’m knitting a sweater with this bizarre mustard-colored yarn with green overtones and tiny flecks of teal and red. It’s pretty hideous, but I can’t get enough of it! I can often gravitate towards a grungy crunchy color, but more importantly, this color has such depth. There is so much going on, but once knitted it’s relatively subtle and cohesive.

    What piece of your work are you the proudest of?

    I’m really proud of how the tile installation I created for the Dining Commons turned out. It was technically really challenging and it required a lot of planning and time to get it right. I made 12 plaster molds of these intricately patterned, dimensional tiles that I used to slip-cast hundreds of tiles. It took months to finish from the initial designing to the tedious glazing process.
Nan Hambrose



Director of Athletics
Girls Varsity Basketball Coach
Rowan University, B.A.
Northeastern University, M.S.
207-685-1667

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  • About Nan

    In your opinion, how do sports help build community?

    Sports are amazing avenues to build casual connections, friendships, and ultimately communities. Being a fan of sports or a particular sports team allows people to connect on a different level. Strangers can sit in an airport and quickly begin conversation while watching a game on tv or noticing a logo on someone's clothing. Sports provide a commonality between people that can build an instant connection. Sports allow us the opportunity to shed our political, religious, or sexual identities and just be fans. They allow people to come together and cheer on their team. 
    During times of great success, fans can be galvanized by wins and championships and in times of significant futility, those very same fans are united by their team's challenges. Our society has witnessed the community that sports can bring in the days after 9/11, after the Boston Marathon Bombing, and even during the COVID 19 pandemic, we are seeking comfort from the community that sports have afforded us in good times and in challenging times.

    What is your favorite sport to watch?

    My favorite sport to watch is women's lacrosse. As a basketball person, people may not believe this, but I could watch women's collegiate lacrosse all day. I love the history of the sport and that the game was once played of fields that were miles and miles long by Native Americans. To see women playing today with such speed, grace, and athleticism is truly a thing of beauty. I have had the opportunity to watch many NCAA Division I Final Fours and Championship games and have always left those games being so impressed by the young women who continue to elevate the game with their amazing skill and determination. As a fan of many sports - by watching lacrosse, it is easy to see how so many sports translate to others. Lacrosse has many similarities to basketball be it in terminology, positioning, or understanding angles. These similarities are some of the reasons I fell in love with lacrosse when I played it for the first time in college.
Michael Hannon



Math Teacher
Boys Varsity Baseball Head Coach
Florida Institute of Technology, B.S.
Southern New Hampshire University, M.S.

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  • About Mike

    What is an activity the requires math that people wouldn’t think does?

    You will find math is everything involving personal finance. Many investors use algorithms to follow the market and to make predictions regarding their investment decisions. Personal finance takes time effort and discipline to manage. It's not easy AND you must be intentional with your strategies. Dave Ramsey, finance guru, will say personal finance is "5th-grade math". If it is 5th-grade math, why do so many people fail at their finances? Budgeting is where the math comes into play the most. Money comes in, you have fixed bills to pay, you need to save for the future and you can even use some for FUN! The difference between the two is the math. It seems simple, but without the discipline and structure to follow a budget with 5th-grade math, you may be in debt. Don't underestimate the power of math in your personal finance decisions!

    Who is the most interesting mathematician you’ve studied?

    A few years ago, I was fortunate enough to attend a professional development week in Santa Fe, New Mexico at Santa Fe Prep and the EE Ford Summer Teacher's Colloquium. We studied many mathematicians including Descartes, Gauss, Euler, Cantor, and Pascal. The mathematician that stood out to me most during that week was Euclid. It's hard to believe that more than 2000 years ago, Euclid and other mathematicians discovered and developed many theories and structures around what we know today as Geometry. He started with a point, defined it, and then made another point. He proceeded to draw a line between the two points to determine that the shortest distance between two points was a LINE. Seems elementary, but 2000 years ago, it was monumental and was just the beginning of his book Elements that included thirteen books of definitions, postulates, propositions, and mathematical proofs. It is arguably the most successful and influential textbook ever written. While he begins his books with elementary Geometry like parallel and perpendicular lines, the books continue through common, everyday math uses such as prime numbers, greatest common factors, and least common multiples. My favorite part of Elements is book 13 where he goes into great detail of the Platonic Solids. This is where the philosophies of Plato collide with the mathematical works of Euclid and it is fascinating to see the interconnected pieces come together.
Pete Hodgin



Social Studies Teacher
Boys Junior Varsity Soccer Head Coach
Boys Junior Varsity Tennis Head Coach
Bowdoin College, B.A.
phodgin@kentshill.org

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  • About Pete

    What is your favorite obscure historical event? Why?

    While probably not an obscure event to most history geeks, the Peloponnesian War (431-405 B.C.E.) between the Athenian Empire and Sparta and its allies is one of my favorites to study, teach, and apply to the modern-day. It still dumfounds me that there isn’t already a 20-part Netflix series about it because this conflict had everything: carnage, romance, soaring oratory, and political scheming, all set against the dazzling backdrop of Greece and the Mediterranean. However, the Peloponnesian War is so much more than that. Pericles’ decision to go to war is a morality play about hubris and political legacy. The Sicilian Campaign is an economic lesson in the “sunk-cost fallacy”, and the Melian Dialogue is a Machiavellian (before Machiavelli!) exploration of realism and ethics in a time of war. The plague of Athens is an abject lesson in what Nassim Nicholas Taleb would later term “Black Swan” theory, and the trial and execution of Socrates (which birthed Plato’s “Republic” in reaction) sheds light on the promise and peril of democratic rule and independent thinking. The war provides so much analytical and conceptual fuel for current political, economic, and social discourse.

    Who is someone from the last 100 years that everyone should know about? Why?

    I went to Dag Hammarskjöld Middle School in Wallingford, Connecticut for three years, never understanding anything more about Hammarskjöld than that he had been “a pilot”. Not only is this arguably not sufficient reason to name a middle school after someone, but it’s also not even true, as I likely conflated this at age 12 with the fact that he died in a controversial plane crash while trying to mitigate the Katanga Crisis in Congo in 1961. It’s embarrassing because Dag Hammarskjöld was a giant; an architect of the progressive economic state in Europe (Hammarskjöld was Swedish), two-term Secretary-General of United Nations and arguably the most effective one it’s ever had, and posthumous recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize for his pursuit of global peace through “preventive diplomacy”. However, Dag Hammarskjöld also serves as an example of the importance of recognizing and valuing someone beyond their public profile. A religion professor at Bowdoin College introduced me to “Markings”, Hammarskjöld’s journal that was published in 1963 with permission that he’d seen fit to grant with a written note left in it while he was still alive. “Markings” is a breathtakingly personal and deeply moving exploration of the nature of service to others, honesty with oneself, spirituality and doubt, and identity and loneliness.
Alexa Holmes



Assistant Director of Student Life
Co-Coordinator of Diversity, Equity, and Belonging
Maine Hall Dorm Head
Girls Varsity Field Hockey Head Coach
Hobart and William Smith Colleges, B.A.
207-685-1620
aholmes@kentshill.org
Lindsey Jenkins



School Nurse
Brandeis University, B.F.A.
Massachusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, B.S.
207-685-1624

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  • About Lindsey

    What are your specialties?

    Before coming to Kents Hill, I worked in a variety of specialties including neurology, behavioral psychiatry, orthopedics, and gynecology oncology. My special interests are concussion treatment, treatment for vaping cessation, orthopedics, wound care, and psychiatric nursing.

    What is one wellness tip or strategy that everyone should know, but might not?

    One thing that I think people should know is that slow breathing, not deep breathing, can help to alleviate physical and mental distress. Deep breathing can lead to hyperventilation which may make things worse. Slow breaths, inhaling through the nose and exhaling through the mouth, are a great practice to learn. An easy way to remember this: Smell the roses and blow out the candles.
RJ Jenkins



Visual Arts Teacher
Cross Country Head Coach
Girls Varsity Basketball Head Coach
Track and Field Head Coach

Bates College, B.A.
rjenkins@kentshill.org

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  • About RJ

    What piece of your work are you the proudest of?

    I have been working on illustrating a children's book with a former colleague of mine for the past 3 years. Her roots are in The Bahamas and when she asked me to illustrate an A-Z book about this amazing country, I was unsure if I was up to the challenge. I knew nothing of the country or culture and previously I had worked primarily as a painter and drawer creating realistic renderings of landscapes and people. When I accepted the invitation, I sought to learn a new medium: painting digitally. The book is 78 pages long and I knew that I would need to work digitally in order to be able to make corrections and edits efficiently. After some trial and error, I was able to develop a style that worked well for the book. Already working a full-time job meant that I had to find time to work in my spare hours. Much of my work has been done in the summer months and over breaks. I am proud of the work because I challenged myself to learn a new medium, work in an unfamiliar style, and because of the breadth of the subject matter. I was also able to learn so much about a place that I had very little knowledge of prior to this project. The book will be released in the late spring of 2020 and I couldn't be more excited to share it with others!

    Who is your favorite artist?

    My favorite artist is painter Edward Hopper. He was an American painter who lived from the late 1800s to the late 1960s. He worked with various media types, but his oil paintings are my favorite. Hopper was able to capture American life, both in rural and urban settings, and boil it down into beautifully quiet and still moments of everyday life. Hopper's use of light and shadow in his work is wonderful. He simplifies his forms in mostly vacant settings while still maintaining realism. He often uses the light that is found in the scene, both ambient and man-made, to accent the forms. His ability to project a reflective and solemn persona into his works fascinates me. When I saw his collection in person at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, I came away inspired and awestruck.
Mary Keeley



Director of Student Learning
Academic Coach
St. Michael's College, B.A.
University of Maine, M.Ed
207-685-1646

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  • About Mary

    What is a good tip to follow when you are stuck on a task?

    It can be very frustrating when you get stuck trying to express a thought, solve a math problem, or any other tasks you encounter that you can’t figure out. When this happens, one strategy to help you move forward is to ask questions to understand why you are having a hard time. Some questions you can ask are: "Do I know what is being asked of me," "Have I seen this problem before," "Do I have all the information and resources I need," and most importantly, "Who can I ask for help?" Asking questions, helps you refocus and gain control of the problem and the steps you need to move forward. Asking for help can alleviate frustration when moving forward seems impossible.

    What is your go-to organizational strategy for your own life?
    Having a monthly calendar with important information helps me remember upcoming events and allows me to see the big picture for the month. However, my weekly planner is the glue that keeps my day to day life organized. Every Monday morning, I fill out a schedule for the week; this includes classes, appointments, practice schedules, and other important information such as birthdays, calls to return, and work-related items. Later I will input relevant information into Google calendar, however, physically writing in my planner allows me to add additional information such as who do I have to reach out to, and what resources do I need to accomplish this task. I also like to do this in hard copy because I get great satisfaction when I cross off items I have accomplished, and because it is always visible, it reminds me of the tasks yet to be completed and motivates me to get them done. 
     
Alison Lincoln-Rich



Interim Dean of Enrollment Management 
Girls Varsity Soccer Coach
207-685-1647


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  • About Alison

    Alison joined Kents Hill School in 2007 as a member of the Business Office where she served as Business Office and Human Resources Manager prior to joining the Admissions team as Director of Financial Aid and Senior Associate Director of Admissions. Alison holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Maine at Augusta. She also serves as an assistant coach of the Girls Varsity Soccer team.
     
    Alison is also a proud parent of Kents Hill graduate, Nathan, class of 2014. She and her husband, Todd, have four children and live in Wayne. Alison enjoys being active, hiking, biking, yoga, playing competitive volleyball, and enjoying time on the beautiful lakes Maine has to offer.  
Andy May



Chief Financial Officer
Northeastern University, B.S.
Northeastern University, M.B.A.
207-685-1640
Katie McLaughlin



Math Teacher
Assistant Director of Student Life
Sampson Hall Dorm Parent
Girls Varsity Ice Hockey Coach
Lifetime Sports Coach
Colby College, B.A.
Thomas College, M.S.Ed.
kmclaughlin@kentshill.org

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  • About Katie

    Is math a tool? Why or why not?

    Math is absolutely a tool. You put it to use more than you think. Math aids individuals in being financially responsible, harnessing technical skills or trades, pursuing specific careers, or being a strong athlete. Life's toolbox would be incomplete without math.

    What is an activity the requires math that people wouldn’t think does?

    There are a lot of physical activities and sports during which people use math without realizing it. Many sports require you to consider angles, force, and torque while playing. Math is used in golf, for example, when players decide which club to use, how to grip the club, where to place their feet, and how hard to swing. Golfers must also implement math when evaluating the terrain and the slope of the fairway or the green.
Addie Michaud


 
Assistant to the Dean of Students
Receptionist
University of Maine, B.A.
University of Maine, B.S.
207-685-1613
Maryke Moreau '09



Science Department Chair
Science Teacher
Maine Hall Dorm Parent
Boys Junior Varsity Soccer Coach
Norwich University, B.S.

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  • About Maryke

    What is a scientific theory that will change the way you view the world?

    I think that string theory if proven, would change how everyone views the world. Not only would it involve unknown forces, but it would mean that there are more dimensions in the universe than what we know and comprehend. To put it simply, if string theory is proven, you won't be able to conceptualize it.

    What is your favorite natural phenomenon?

    As a physicist, my favorite natural phenomenon occurs at one of my favorite places, the beach. In fact, I think all physicists like going to be beaches because we like the waves.
Jeff Munson



STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math) Division Head Director of Community Engagement
U.S. Naval Academy, B.S.
Naval War College, M.A.
jmunson@kentshill.org

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  • About Jeff

    What is a scientific theory that will change the way you view the world?

    I’m fascinated by the ideas of Dark Matter and Dark Energy – the thought that about 95% of the universe consists of things that we are completely unable to detect. Dark matter/energy is believed to be all around us, yet we can only surmise its existence based on the effects that it has on things we can see. This is science at its best: using clues about the 5% of things we know to extrapolate answers to the rest. And if we discover the nature of dark energy/matter, what else will we find that we don’t know?

    What is your favorite natural phenomenon?

    My favorite natural phenomenon is the refraction (bending) of light through the atmosphere. This is most noticeable at sunrise and sunset when the refraction causes other colors to scatter, and we are left with the brilliant reds and yellows and oranges that we see. I always loved getting up on the deck of my ship at sunset when I was in the Navy, because in very rare circumstances, you can see something called the Green Flash - a short lived bright flash of green at the top of the sun just before it sets completely. I only ever saw it twice in 6 years at sea, but it was awesome.
Kim Nanof



Social Studies Department Chair
Social Studies Teacher
Northeastern University, B.S.
St. Joseph's College, M.S.
knanof@kentshill.org

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  • About Kim

    If you could live in any period of history, what would it be? Why?

    If I could live in any period of history, I would choose The Renaissance era during the 16th century; particularly that which was rooted in Italy specifically. The period has always fascinated me because it was the transition between the Middle Ages and the greatest modern era of social change. While traveling twice to Italy, I had the opportunity to see the work of greats such as Michelangelo, Donatello, DaVinci, Boticelli and my favorite piece by Raphael titled "School of Athens," and the architecture of Brunelleschi's dome on the Santa Maria del Fiore cathedral, and many others. As a history teacher, there is nothing more inspiring than being in the physical presence of historical greatness.

    Who is someone from the last 100 years that everyone should know about? Why?

    Everyone should know Jimmy Valvano. On March 3rd, 1993 during ESPN's Excellence in Sports Performance Yearly Award ceremony (The ESPY's) Jimmy Valvano was accepting The Arthur Ashe Courage Award, and gave one of the most unforgettable speeches about sports and life to date. It's emotional, important and anyone who has not seen it should spend eleven minutes watching it and sharing it with others. He was a sports broadcaster and former college basketball coach who was fighting against cancer, a battle he would tragically lose. In that speech, he talks about so many life lessons; "you should do three things every day 1. laugh 2. think 3. cry... if you do that every day, that's a full day", the second was "you should remember where you came from, where you are, and where you want to be," and perhaps the most notable, "don't give up, don't ever give up." Finally, during that speech, he announced The V Foundation for Cancer Research which was founded by ESPN and the legendary basketball coach as a way to raise money for cancer research. Since its start in 1993, the V Foundation has awarded hundreds of millions in cancer research grants and continues to push for a cure in honor of Valvano.
Wilson Onu



Associate Dean of Academics
Social Studies Teacher
Librarian
 
American College Dublin, B.A.
Lynn University, M.B.A
Lynn University, Ed.D.
207-685-1674
wonu@kentshill.org
Ellen Pelkey



Accounting Assistant
epelkey@kentshill.org
Katie Petrillo



Math Department Chair
Assistant Dean of Students
Math Teacher
Davis Hall Dorm Parent
Northeastern University, B.A.

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  • About Katie

    Is math a tool? Why or why not?

    Math is a tool that exists every day all around us and we often have no idea when we are using it. It is obvious when we are asked to use math in our classes, but we also use it on the athletics fields and on the ice when we try to aim at the right angle to make a pass or score a goal. We use math when we are out shopping and think about how much money we have to spend. Math creeps into life while we are driving cars and riding bikes and need to think about slowing down and speeding up. We are all constantly using math in places where we most, and least, expect it.

    Who is the most interesting mathematician you’ve studied?

    When I think of mathematicians, one of my favorites, M.C. Escher, described himself only as an artist and someone who was not skilled at math. I love to think about him as a mathematician and to use his works in my classroom teaching. He is a prime example of one who lacked confidence in math, yet produced works of art that have astounded mathematicians for decades. I hope that Escher shows that you can be "good at math" even when you do not initially realize it.
Alecia Pickett



English Teacher
Reed Hall Dorm Parent
Girls Varsity Soccer Coach
Union College, B.A.
apickett@kentshill.org

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  • About Alecia

    What is a book that changed your life?

    The work that changed my life is a short story by Roger Zelazny called “For a Breath I Tarry”. The title pays homage to an A.E. Housman poem in his collection, A Shropshire Lad. In essence, the poem says, we are in this world for a brief period, so say what’s in your heart before the wind carries us away again. Zelazny’s tale is the story of a robot on Earth many years after mankind’s extinction. The robot, Frost, works tirelessly to discover what it means to be human. The story changed me because it opened my eyes to the beauty of the human condition. To be human is to be messy, and make mistakes. In reading this story, I realized how lucky we are to experience our lives if we allow ourselves to wholly embrace the process.

    What is your best trick for curing writer’s block?

    I’ve found that the best trick for writer’s block is to talk to yourself. Every time I get stuck, I try to say what I’m thinking out loud. We tend to be stronger speakers than writers, as a rule. We talk all day, every day, but writing for various reason feels daunting. To combat the monster, I put the pen down, the computer away, and pretend I’m presenting or having a conversation with a friend regarding whatever subject I’m stuck on. Nine times out of ten, I can explain it out loud well enough to go back to the drawing board and get something on paper. It’s never pretty in its first draft form, but just to write and have something is always better than being stuck.
Benjamin Priest



Dean of Academics
Humanities (English, Social Studies, World Languages) Division Head
English Teacher
Wesleyan Hall Dorm Parent
University of Maine, B.A.
The State University of New York at Buffalo, M.A.
The State University of New York at Buffalo, Ph.D.
bpriest@kentshill.org

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  • About Ben

    What is a book that changed your life?

    The Color Purple by Alice Walker. I grew up in a small and conservative-ish town in Maine. Diversity wasn't a big focus of my K-12 education, and while I was a big reader in high school, I started college without ever having read a novel by a black woman. This one's a doozy - it's harrowing in places, but the writing is consistently gorgeous and the ending will make you cry or cheer or both. Reading Walker as a college sophomore lifted me out of my experience in a life-altering way. I still feel grateful to the teacher who introduced me to her work.

    What is your best trick for curing writer’s block?

    Give yourself permission to write badly when attempting a first draft. Many of us feel intimidated when we open a document and see all of that blank space; the best way to overcome that feeling is to write whatever comes to mind and promise yourself that you can always go back and perfect it later. The Beat Generation writers used to say, "First thought, best thought." That's almost certainly wrong. Write badly the first time around and revise your work later.
Josh Reynolds



Director of Leadership Giving
Reed Hall Dorm Parent
Alpine Skiing Coach
Mountain Biking Coach
University of New Hampshire, B.A.
207-685-1670
jreynolds@kentshill.org

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  • About Josh

    Josh graduated from the University of New Hampshire in 1995 and served in the United States Army as a commission officer. Following his military service and a number of years in corporate sales and non-profit development, Josh returned with his wife and children to his home state of Maine.

    As the Director of Leadership Giving, Josh is responsible for cultivating and maintaining relationships with major gift donors and supporting the ongoing capital campaigns that drive the growth and prosperity of Kents Hill School. Josh is a competitive skier and fulfills his passion for student athletes and ski racing as the Assistant Varsity Coach of the Kents Hill Alpine Team.
Mackenzie Sage



Science Teacher
Academic Coach
Maine Hall Dorm Parent
Cross Country Coach
Boys Junior Varsity Basketball Coach
Hobart and William Smith College, B.A
msage@kentshill.org

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  • About Mackenzie

    What are the subjects that you most enjoy helping students with?

    The two subjects I enjoy helping my students with most would be history and chemistry. Chemistry was one of my favorite subjects throughout college and high school. I love chemistry because it gives me the ability to better understand some of the building blocks of the world around us. I also love helping a student with their history work. Being able to work with students to connect historical events and the ways in which they still impact our lives today is always interesting and exciting. It is also fun to show them the creative ways in which we can tell the stories of what has already happened and how we can learn from and improve upon the past. 


Trevor Slater



PEAK Program Chair
Academic Coach
Social Studies Teacher
Boys Junior Varsity Basketball Head Coach
Outing Club Director

Hampshire College, B.A.
University of Southern Maine, M.Ed.
207-685-1654
tslater@kentshill.org

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  • About Trevor

    What are the subjects that you most enjoy helping students with?

    I really like helping students with math and history problems. I like working on math because it is formulaic and rules bound. If you know and follow the rules, then you can solve any problem. Math is just a puzzle that needs all the pieces to fit together just so. History, on the other hand, is full of ambiguity and subjectivity. I love to debate and discuss the different ways to interpret and understand the same events from different peoples' perspectives. However, I most enjoy how all historical events fit into a greater context and massive system so every event affects the course of all other events.

    What is a good tip to follow when you are stuck on a task?

    When I get stuck on a task I like to take the puzzlers approach. I don't want to keep banging my head against a wall or searching for a particular piece to the puzzle for hours, so I get up and walk around. Take a short break. It has to have a set time limit so you don't procrastinate, but a simple task to break up the time, change your perspective, or get new ideas can be great for getting unstuck. Sometimes when you get up, get a drink of water, and walk around a bit, when you return you find that puzzle piece you were seeking. Or, even more likely, you might find a different puzzle piece you weren't even looking for but gets the ball rolling again anyway.

     
     
     
Brian Smith



Social Studies Teacher
Coordinator of Diversity, Equity, and Belonging
Varsity Golf Head Coach
Boys Varsity Basketball Head Coach

College of Wooster, B.A.
bsmith@kentshill.org

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  • About Brian

    If you could live in any period of history, what would it be? Why?

    If I could live in any time period, I would choose the 1950s or early 1960s. My wife and I always joke about how we wish we could jump in a Delorean and go back to the 1950s (we were both born in the late 1980s) because things seemed so much more peaceful and happy-go-lucky. Listening to my parents talk about growing up in the late fifties and early sixties just sounds like a great time to be alive. It was post-WWII, there was a huge sense of patriotism in a world where everyone was constantly on edge before, and neighborhoods were bustling with block parties, cookouts, kids played outside all the time. No one locked their doors, and people seemed very care-free. Not to mention, so many amazing things happened historically, like the space race and huge technological advancements, and some of the most beautiful muscle cars ever built came out in the late 50s and 60s. I think it would be very cool to experience life in what every black and white sitcom portrayed on Nick at Nite when I was a kid.

    Who is someone from the last 100 years that everyone should know about? Why?

    Someone from the last 100 years that everyone should know about is Tupac Shakur. While labeled improperly as a "thug" and "gangster" due to his persona shown in the media, he was an incredibly intelligent, caring, and well-spoken individual who possessed an impressive mind when it came to the rift between white and black America and how the inequalities of wealth, social status, and racial differences shaped the 80s and 90s in urban America. He has an incredibly aggressive message in his music, but if you take the time to listen to his lyrics (or read his actual poetry) his eloquence and reproach to societal issues are truly inspiring and provocative.
Maureen Whitestone



Assistant Director of the Akin Learning Center
Social Studies Teacher
Academic Coach

Marywood University, B.S.
Bowling Green University, M.A.
207-685-1679

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  • About Maureen

    What are your specialties?

    At the Kents Hill School Health Center, we support students who are struggling with a variety of emotional issues. I'm not sure that I would characterize this as a specific area of expertise, but my practice with students is to form a trusting relationship that will allow the students to work on issues such as self-esteem, social connection, and identity. My hope is that they will learn the skills and confidence to better navigate their stresses and be emotionally equipped to move into the next stage of their lives after leaving Kents Hill School.

    What is one wellness tip or strategy that everyone should know, but might not?

    One strategy that can really increase your sense of well-being is to take some time each day to feel and express gratitude to others in your life. It not only makes them feel great but also helps you center yourself and appreciate the important people and events that impact you each day.
1614 Main Street, Kents Hill, Maine 04349       |       207-685-4914       |       info@kentshill.org